Maintaining Structural Integrity

INSIDE THE PROJECT

Due to recent site improvements at the liquid cargo facility, and the US Army Corps of Engineers proposed deepening of the Indiana Harbor Canal, Kokosing was chosen to replace the old dockwall with a new steel sheet pile wall with sufficient structural capacity to withstand these changes.  The project was bid as a fixed price contract.  Due to underwater constructability issues and environmental concerns our team proposed a voluntary alternate design to eliminate these issues and concerns.  This allowed for a safer work environment, and shortened the construction schedule.  Our batter pile alternate to the drilled anchor design saved the Owner over $3.1 million dollars.

Our redesign allowed the new wall to be built over the existing wall and around exi sting underground gas, water, and electric utilities on the active site.  The result is a sheet pile wall supported by 108 batter piles driven on a 63-degree angle.  Each batter pile was over 100 feet in length.  Each batter pile was welded to a horizontal beam that attached to the back of the new sheeting. The batter pile, beam, and sheet pile connections were tied together with a new structural concrete walkway along the top of the new dockwall.

WHY IT MATTERS

The Owner was under a time constraint to finish this work before the Corps of Engineers deepened the shipping channel adjacent to this dock.  By upgrading ahead of schedule, the owner has continued moving liquid products and cargo through this terminal without delays or shutdowns. The new dock provides a safer asset for the company, the surrounding community, and the environment for years to come.

BEYOND THE PROJECT

As a result of Kokosing’s performance and voluntary alternate savings, this Owner has awarded several additional projects to Kokosing’s family of companies including Kokosing Industrial and Kokosing Integrity Pipeline Services.

Block Island Wind Farm

INSIDE THE PROJECT

The Block Island Wind cable project involved two owners: Deepwater Wind and National Grid. Deepwater Wind owns and was responsible for installing the five offshore wind turbines, four 3,200 linear foot array cables between turbines and the six-mile export cable to Block Island. National Grid owns and installed the 22-mile transmission cable between Block Island and Narragansett, Rhode Island. LS Cable was contracted to supply and install all of the 35 kV power cables for the project. LS contracted with Kokosing Industrial Durocher Marine Division to install and bury all cables.

The Durocher Marine installation team designed and constructed a self-propelled, USCG approved, Dynamic Positioned Barge (DP-2) to safely and precisely lay and bury the subsea cable installations. The system utilized six 500 HP thrusters for propulsion that were mounted on a 260-foot by 72-foot by 16-foot ABS barge. Mobilization of the cable lay vessel began in January of 2016 in Florida and was completed in April in Rhode Island. The total 28 miles of cables weighed 3,400 metric tons and were coiled in a holding tank built on the deck of the lay vessel. The installations began in May with the export cable and ended in July of 2016 with the installation of the array cables. The subsea cables were all installed successfully and buried to six feet along the cable lay routes.

WHY IT MATTERS

The Deepwater Wind Farm is the first offshore wind project constructed in North America. It consists of five wind turbines which are located approximately six miles off the East coast of Block Island, Rhode Island and approximately 20 miles from mainland Rhode Island. The combined electric power output from the five wind turbines is 30 MWs which will service 17,000 homes. Prior to the installation of the National Grid transmission line to Block Island and the Deepwater Wind farm, the island relied entirely on diesel generators for electricity. The wind farm will be able to produce electricity for the island at a lower cost and environmental impact than the existing diesel powered infrastructure. The five wind turbines went into commercial service in December 2016.

 

Redirecting Power around San Francisco

Inside the Project

Sumitomo Electric subcontracted the subaqueous installation of the three 240kV transmission and fiber optic cables between the Potrero and Embarcadero Substations in downtown San Francisco. Prior to our arrival the owner installed three HDPE conduits at each substation. The conduits extend out from the harbor into 35 feet – 85 feet of water and were 1,000 feet and 1200 feet long. Ships from Japan delivered the three cables in individual tubs to the Port in San Francisco. Each tub weighed approximately 320 tons. After mobilizing our lay barge a single tub was set onto our 1,000-ton portable turntable. The lay barge moved into position and pulled the first power and fiber cable to the Potrero substation via the conduits. After the cable was secure the lay barge simultaneously laid and buried the 5-13/16-inch power cable and fiber optic cable with our water jet plow. Each lay route was a distance of 12,700 feet to the second conduit. At the second conduit the lay barge stopped, floated 2,100 feet of cable in a tidal zone, and winched the cables up the conduit to the Embarcadero Substation. The process was repeated two more times.

Why it matters

Downtown San Francisco is a very busy and highly developed area. The owner investigated three options for the 240kV installation. Two of the options were through the city streets of San Francisco. Each of these routes crossed the I-280 corridor and other sensitive areas. These options were not economically viable. Moving the lay route out into the bay circumvented most of the logistical problems associated with navigating this construction through the city.

For a deeper look into the project, read the latest story in Transmission and Distribution World.

Rebuilding Cleveland’s Outer Breakwall

Inside the project

In October of 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused severe damage to the Outer Breakwall in Cleveland Ohio. The repair required multiple layers of breakwall stone to shore up the lakeward side. The outer layer included 5 – 11 Ton Armor Stone. All the stone materials were purchased from Area Aggregates, an Affiliate of Olen Corporation. The stone was produced at the Woodville Quarry. From there it was shipped to a dock, loaded on barges, and towed to the Cleveland Harbor on deck barges. Our crew placed all the stone with an 895 Liehberr Crane.

Why it matters

Rebuilding the Outer Breakwall in Cleveland Harbor will reduce wave action inside the harbor. Reducing wave action makes the Port of Cleveland safer for vessels entering the harbor and protects moored ships from storm damage. Overall it makes the Port of Cleveland a more attractive option for shipping business in the Great Lakes.

Preserving 100 Years of Hydroelectric Generation Service

Inside the Project

Cloverland Electric’s Power Canal in Sault Ste. Marie Michigan was built over 100 years ago. Durocher Marine was hired to repair 3,800 ft of the canal with precast concrete units that form a new wall. First the existing wall and fill are removed to the top of the existing timber pile bent structure. Then the concrete units are placed side to side along the top of the timber canal structure and backfilled. Access in the canal is severely limited due to the Head Gates at the entrance of the canal, 9 bridges, and the Powerhouse. Working time is also restricted due to peak summer electricity demand in July and August. Working time is also restricted by winter conditions in the Northern climate. Expected completion Fall 2017.

Why it matters

This work is very challenging, but very necessary to the owner. Our crews work around weather conditions and Peak Power demands to rehabilitate a landmark structure that has been in service for over 100 years. Helping the Owner keep the canal operational and functional for the next 100.

Rebuilding Industrial Commerce

Inside the Project

The 5-year project involves dredging and disposal of 2,000,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment from the Indiana Harbor and Canal (IHC). Dredging of the IHC had been deferred since 1972 while a technically and economically feasible and environmentally acceptable plan was developed. A Confined Disposal Facility (CDF) was built to contain all sediments. Our crews dredge within the confines of the canal in areas designated by the owner using a 15 CY Cable Arm bucket. The sediments are transported by sealed hopper barges to the CDF where crew and equipment offload and pump the material in a slurry into the CDF. The slurry water is recirculated to transport more sediments to the CDF. Each yard of material is screened through a debris separation barge before it is hydraulically transported to the CDF. All debris larger than 2” is separated and accumulated inside the debris separation barge. The debris is transferred into the CDF mechanically with excavating equipment. All work is monitored and controlled by software and high tech equipment specifically designed for the work.

Why it matters

Dredging the IHC serves 2 major purposes. Firstly, deepening the waterway will enhance navigation and be beneficial to the delivery of bulk materials to and from businesses along the canal and inside the harbor. In some places over 15 ft of sediment has accumulated and is blocking shipments meant for delivery inside the IHC. Secondly, the sediments are contaminated and are being removed from a tributary of Lake Michigan. Some of these materials are TSCA level contaminants, which are defined as “materials that pose unreasonable risk of injury to health or the environment”.

Making Deeper Water for the Replacement Lock

Inside the project

One of the early phases of the proposed Replacement Lock in Sault Ste. Marie, MI required deepening the Federal Channel in the downstream approach to the new lock. The deepening required drilling and blasting 77,000 cubic yards of in-situ material consisting mostly of virgin Jacobsville sandstone. Once blasted the material was excavated and loaded into barges. A tug and barges transported the material upstream to the disposal area where it was unloaded and hauled to the Government furnished disposal area and placed. Using explosives in the proximity of the Federal Channel and Soo Locks required working closely with the US Coast Guard, ATF, and Corps of Engineers. The blasting activities so close to the existing lock structures required extensive monitoring throughout the project.

Why it matters

The downstream deepening of the approach for the Replacement Lock is now complete. When Lawmakers decide to fund the new lock this dredging work will be 100% complete.

Performance under Duress and Scrutiny

About the Project

Low water conditions created a crisis for the St. Louis Corps of Engineers District between miles 39 to 47 of the Mississippi River. The Corps issued Durocher Marine a “letter contract” and ordered us to proceed to the work as quickly as possible. We mobilized a fleet of equipment to the site and prepared to begin work. Within our 10 day mobilization our managers compiled the necessary submittals to legally perform the work for the Corps. The work consisted of removing a total of 136 cubic yards of unspecified rock removal from over 200 locations spread across 33 acres of the river. The work included drilling and blasting many high spots or pinnacles that were undiggable with our excavators. It also included sediment removal, and large boulder extraction from the river. All materials were disposed within the confines of the river in deep areas. Commercial Traffic was allowed through our work zone from 10pm to 6am.

Why it matters

The work was initiated under duress. We responded in a very timely manner to meet the Corps’ fast paced schedule. Our crews worked 24/7 throughout the project through winter conditions. All work efforts were performed without incident including all drilling and blasting activities. We worked seamlessly with all agencies and interested parties involved in the project. We met all our deadlines and completed the work while working under immense public attention. The project resulted in Navigational and Economic Benefits to the cargo industry.

Getting Green Power to the Grid

About the Project

McLean’s Mountain Wind Farm is located on Manitoulin Island, Ontario Canada. The wind farm is rated to produce 60MW of electricity from 103 turbines. Getting power to the Provincial Grid required crossing the 2,000 ft Little Current Channel between Manitoulin and Goat Islands with 3 – 115kV submarine power cables and grounds. Both the northern and southern shorelines required extensive shoreline excavation to guarantee adequate trench depth for the cables. The north shore also required 860 ft of duct bank cut into rock. At each end of the project the submarine cables were terminated at junction boxes. The cables were laid individually. Upon completion of laying the cables a stone sub-base, cable separators, and articulated concrete mats were added to protect the cables.

Why it matters

This is the first project Durocher Marine has completed in Canadian Waters. The Coasting Trade Act in Canada required all floating equipment to be constructed in Canada. We worked with a local marine contractor for the marine support. Several of our managers were allowed onsite with work permits. In 2009 the Ontario legislature introduced the…